Eleanor Burlingham Memorial County Park
Waldron Terrace, Sloatsburg, Rockland County, NY
41 acres


Directions:

I-87 over the Tappan Zee bridge to exit 15A (Route 17 north).  Make a left turn onto Route 17 N. Travel up to Seven Lakes Drive and turn right.  Drive 0.3 of a mile and turn right onto Waldron Terrace.  Drive to the area between the last house on the left and the private road ahead (by the Ramapo Service Area on the US 87 highway).  Park at a small pull-off on the right.  

There are many small pieces of land along the Ramapo River here.  If you want to explore these smaller pieces look at the map listed below. 


Geology/Topography:

The Ramapo River heads through this park in the Hudson Highlands.


History:

before 1662  -- Jan Pietersen Slot from Holstein sailed to America. His great-grandson, who was born in Hackensack, New Jersey, gave his name to Sloatsburg.

1815 -- Sloats Pond Dam built by Jacob Sloat for the Sloatsburg cotton mills that in turn led to the growth of the Village of Sloatsburg.

1987  -- 37 acres acquired through tax delinquency.

1995  -- 4 acres donated.

1992  -- park dedicated. Eleanor Burlingham was a well-known environmentalist in Rockland County.


Facilities/Activities: 

Fishing, canoeing, hiking, and picnicking.


Map:

http://www.co.rockland.ny.us/environ/maps/Eburlingham.pdf


Trails:

12/11/2004.  Wife Rosemary and brother-in-law Ceferino Santana parked at the small pull-off by the short dam across the Rampapo River. The waters were running fast because of rains the previous night and day.  There is only a small area of woods between the road and the river.  We walked up and down the wood's edge and then I went down to the river bank to walk the short distances available.  There do not appear to be any trails in the woods.  Dr. Patrick L. Cooney.


PLANT LIST:
Dr. Patrick L. Cooney


Trees:
Acer rubrum (red maple)
Acer saccharum (sugar maple)
Betula populifolia (gray birch)
Carpinus caroliniana (musclewood)
Fagus grandifolia (American beech)
Platanus occidentalis (American sycamore)
Prunus serotina (black cherry)
Quercus alba (white oak)
Quercus prinus (chestnut oak)
Quercus rubra (red oak)
Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust)
Tilia americana (American basswood)
Tsuga canadensis (eastern hemlock)
Ulmus sp. (elm)

Shrubs:
Berberis thunbergii (Japanese barberry)
Cornus amomum (swamp dogwood)
Decodon verticillatus (swamp loosestrife)
Euonymus alatus (winged euonymus)
Hamamelis virginiana (witch hazel)
Ilex verticillata (winterberry holly)
Rhus glauca (smooth sumac)
Rosa multiflora (multiflora rose)
Rubus occidentalis (black raspberry)
Rubus sp. (blackberry)

Vines:
Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle)
Toxicodendron radicans (poison ivy)
Vitis aestivalis (summer grape)

Herbs:
Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard)
Allium vineale (field garlic)
Artemisia vulgaris (common mugwort)
Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle)
Dianthus armeria (Deptford pink)
Lemna sp. (duckweed)
Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife)
Solidago sp. (goldenrod)
Trifolium sp. (clover)

Rushes:
Juncus tenuis (path rush)

Sedges:
Carex laxiflora type (loose-flowered sedge type)

Grasses:
Eragrostis spectabilis (purple love grass)
Setaria glauca (yellow foxtail grass)

Ferns:
Dryopteris marginalis (marginal woodfern)