DWARF FOREST OF THE PLAINS AROUND WARREN GROVE
Warren Grove, Ocean County, NJ (southeast corner)


The town of Warren Grove is located in Ocean County but some of the plains sites are located along the Burlington-Ocean County line.

West Plains (along Burlington-Ocean County line)
Little Plains (just northwest of Warren Grove)
East Plains (along Burlington-Ocean County line)
South Plains or Spring Hill (the smallest area -- along and just beyond the northern border of Penn State Forest)
Info from Boyd (1991)

Dwarf plains. Fires are more frequent in the dwarf forest than anywhere else. There are three or more fires within a six year period, as opposed to one per six or seven years in the pine barrens in general. Instead of the pitch pine rising 50 or 60 feet, they only rise 5 feet. The cones are more of the closed-cone type than the open-cone type. (McPhee 1968:122-123)


Habitat:

Here grows a short, scrubby forest. The dominant species is Pinus rigida (pitch pine), but this one is a special race of pitch pine that is a closed-cone species (serotinous). These cones open only after being subjected to the very high temperatures of forest fires.

Also here are blackjack oak (Quercus marilandica) and scrub oak (Quercus ilicifolia).


PLANT LIST:
Linda Kelly; Road to Warren Grove
* = blooming on 7/27/02


Trees:
Acer rubrum (red maple)
Chamaecyparis thyoides (Atlantic white cedar)
Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay magnolia)

Shrubs and sub-shrubs:
Chamaedaphne calyculata (leatherleaf)
Clethra alnifolia (sweet pepperbush) *
Eubotrys racemosa (fetterbush)
Gaultheria procumbens (teaberry)
Gaylussacia dumosa (swamp huckleberry)
Gaylussacia frondosa (dangle huckleberry)
Ilex glabra (inkberry)
Leiophyllum buxifolium (sand myrtle)
Rhododendron viscosum (swamp azalea)
Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry)

Herbs:
Anthemis sp. (mayweed) *
Apocynum cannabinum (Indian Hemp dogbane)
Arctium sp. (burdock)
Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle)
Drosera intermedia (spatulate leaved sundew)
Drosera rotundifolia (round-leaved sundew) *
Eriocaulon sp. (pipewort)
Hypericum gentianoides (orange grass) *
Nymphaea odorata (white water lily) *
Orontium aquaticum (neverwet)
Peltandra virginica (arrow arum)
Polygala brevifolia (short-leaved milkwort) *
Polygala cruciata (cross-leaved milkwort) *
Rhexia virginica (meadowbeauty) *
Sagittaria sp. (arrowhead)
Sparganium sp. (burreed)
Triadenum virginicum (marsh St. Johnswort)
Triodanis perfoliata (Venus's looking glass)
Utricularia fibrosa (fibrous bladderwort) *
Viola primulifolia (primrose-leaved violet)
Xyris sp. (yellow-eyed grass) *

Rushes:
Juncus effusus (soft rush)

Sedges:
Carex exilis (sacksedge)
Dulichium arundinaceum (three-way sedge)
Eriophorum sp. (cotton grass)
Rhynchospora alba (white beakrush)
Scirpus cyperinus (woolly grass bulrush)
Scirpus subterminalis (water bulrush)
Scleria triglomerata (three-clustered whip grass)

Grasses:
Andropogon virginicus var. abbreviatus (Virginia broom sedgegrass)
Leersia oryzoides (rice cutgrass)
Panicum ensifolium (sword-shaped panicgrass)
Panicum virgatum (switch panicgrass)

Others:
Cladonia cristatella (British soldiers)
Sphagnum sp. (sphagnum moss)


WEST PLAIN.

April 7, 1935 p. 72
Fifteen members and guests assembled at Point Pleasant and in a procession of four cars advanced to the Pine Barrens, south of Warren Grove. We found Corema in perfection, Arbutus and Pyxidanthera were just coming into bloom. Dendrium was abundant, but not in bloom. A few flowers of Leucothoe were found. We visited a cranberry bog which was just being made and had an explanation of how bogs are made and cared for. Orontium was beginning to show its gold.
Vernon L. Frazee


April 3, 1949. The main purpose of the trip was to view the broom crowberry (Corema conradii) in flower. The season being somewhat advanced, only scattered blossoms remained. The station near Sim's Place was still healthy and vigorous. It is safe to say that on the West Plains acres of the crowberry are in good condition. The trailing arbutus (Epigaea repens), pyxie moss (Pyxidanthera barbulata), and sand myrtle (Dendrium buxifolium) were in bloom on the Plains and even a few early blossoms of the pine barren heather (Hudsonia ericoides) appeared.